Preview — On Story: “Tadpoles”

The idea of landing on the moon has been a part of film since a very early stage in cinema. George Méliès’ A Trip to the Moon in 1902 is a prime example of this speculation and wonderment. I’m almost positive when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon in 1969, they were disappointed to see the absence of moon monsters leaping around. Can you imagine how Méliès would feel if he saw something as beloved as Star Wars almost 75 years later? The question behind these films, for me at least, is… why? Why this fascination with the unknown? What devices do filmmakers use to suspend us in this environment so unlike our every-day lives?

Ouch.

I have a feeling my question may be answered in this week’s episode of ‘On Story’. The Austin Film Festival is featuring writers of the latest Star Trek, Transformers, and Watchmen. They will be discussing the tricks of the Sci-Fi trade and the devices used in order to create fantastical worlds. Larry Kasdan also relays his memories of working with George Lucas on The Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) and reminisces about his position as screenwriter on Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back (1980). I’m also pleased to see Damon Lindelof in the line-up of interviews… has Lost really been off the air for two years?

Join me tonight at 5:30P on KACV for this episode of ‘On Story’. Oh, and if you’re confused about the title of tonight’s episode “Tadpoles”, watch the last ten minutes of the episode — they always include a short film by a local filmmaker! Check back tomorrow for a Double Take…

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